Around the web – October 2018

Last Sunday was International Day of Creole. How much do you know about Creole languages? In the meantime, here’s a look at the most popular stories about language and translation for October.

Hermes was billed as “the first online subtitling and translation test and indexing system by a major content creator”

Do you need to see the whole flower or examine the nitty-gritty detail? asks colleague Patricia Lane

  • Acclaimed translator Anthea Bell passed away on 18th October. Read her obituary, and an article about her work here.

Anthea Bell changed the name of Obelix’s small, evil-tempered dog from Idéfix to Dogmatix and named the local druid Getafix. (Photograph: Courtesy of Jewish Museum London)

Part of the reason is that the language in question is not really a single language at all

French protestors accuse President Emmanuel Macron of spreading fake news. (AFP PHOTO / ALAIN JOCARD)

  • In a depressingly regular slot, the language fail of the month goes to Coca Cola in New Zealand who attempted to combine Maori and English. They clearly didn’t check with a native speaker of Maori, so their advertisement “Kia Ora, Mate” translates to “Hello, death”.

Coca-Cola made an embarrassing Māori faux-pas

  • Language use: should you avoid employing the adverb ‘presently’? Stan Carey takes a look.
  • Why does the letter Q almost always need to be followed by the letter U? And what’s the origin of the F-word? Find out here and here.

Q is the second most rarely used letter in the alphabet

 

Further reading:

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