Around the web – February 2016

This month I was very pleased to be back at the Career Fair of a local junior high school for the third year running, giving a morning of presentations about the translation and interpreting profession. As well as being the month of International Mother Language Day, of course February also sees Valentine’s Day, and it turns out that both women and men rank grammar as more important than confidence in a potential relationship! Anyway here’s a round-up of the most popular articles about translation and language that have appeared online this past month.

Screen Shot 2016-02-28 at 20.57.35

 One of the many recent additions to the Oxford English Dictionary. Photograph: Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images

One of the many recent additions to the Oxford English Dictionary. Photograph: Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images

The Dutch word for whipped cream is 'slag room'...

The Dutch word for whipped cream is ‘slag room’…

In French:

 

Related articles:

Advertisements

Around the web – January 2016

Has 2016 got off to a good start for you? I was pleased to see the publication this month of one of my side projects: the Insight Guide to Mauritius, Reunion & Seychelles, for which I revised and updated the Reunion section. Anyway here’s a round-up of the most popular language and translation-related articles that have appeared online this past month.

The realities of speech are much more complicated than the words used to describe it. (David Gray / Reuters)

The realities of speech are much more complicated than the words used to describe it. (David Gray / Reuters)

  • Aside from the obvious spelling differences between theatre (UK) and theater (US), did you know there are also differences in meaning? Lynne Murphy tells all in her Separated by a Common Language blog.
  • Colleague Simon Berrill blogged about the trustworthiness (or not) of his personal accounting system. How many clients have you failed to invoice?
  • If you’re a French to English, German, Spanish, Italian or Portuguese translator you’ll find this list of France’s official Ministry & Minister title translations handy.
  • English to Italian translator Valentina Ambrogio blogged about her experience with translation scammers.
  • As a freelancer, where do you find is the most product place to work? Coffee shop? Co-working space? Home?
  • Ever get fed up with the question “so how many languages do you speak?” when you meet someone for the first time? Well here’s a way to strike back.
 A handy guide to atmospheric elevation of spoken communication

The linguists strike back…

  • Do you use ‘air punctuation’? Or get annoyed by people who do? Take a look at this tongue-in-cheek guide.
A handy guide to atmospheric elevation of spoken communication

(Part of) A handy guide to atmospheric elevation of spoken communication

In French: Il me court sur le haricot. What it means: He’s annoying me. (James Chapman / BuzzFeed)

In French: Il me court sur le haricot.
What it means: He’s annoying me.
(James Chapman / BuzzFeed)

  • Finally, if you don’t know Alexandra Hispafra’s blog, do take a look (in French). Amongst other posts she regularly interviews linguists, and I was delighted to be January’s guest translator.

 

Related articles: