Around the web – November 2019

Here’s your round-up of the penultimate month of the year’s most popular stories about language, translation and interpreting.

It is hard to tackle a problem you are afraid to name.

In 2019, dozens of emojis showed up in legal cases.

Icelander Kristjan Asgeirsson lost $68,000 in an online scam. The people of Iceland are no longer protected from online fraud because of their linguistic isolation.

What does “milkshaking” refer to?

Further reading:

Around the web – October 2019

October 10th marked a minor milestone for me, as I celebrated the 10th birthday of my Twitter account. Partly based on results from my Twitter feed, here’s your monthly round-up of October’s most popular stories about language, translation and interpreting.

A collection of Native American utensils and weapons. (source: Getty)

The polarisation of politics has led to a new lexicon of insults

Going greener in your office

Could Brexit translate into a comeback for the French language?

Further reading:

Around the web – September 2019

Here’s your monthly round-up of September’s most popular stories about language and translation.

  • In The Guardian: The role of dictionaries is to reflect language use, not to shape it. Yet many people see dictionaries as language prescribers not describers.
  • Also in The Guardian: imagine you’re a young journalist and helpfully “fix” US spellings for UK ones, thereby indirectly causing an international incident (and 15 years later your mistake makes it to the big screen). Just like for translators, context is everything!
  • Wars of words: “Places that accept foreign words with a live-and-let-live attitude are the exceptions”.

Languages are a battleground for nationalists
Sometimes they even invent them

Two of the Mayan Girls gather around a laptop and phone to record a Facebook Live video about measles with a Guatemalan-Maya Center outreach staffer                         (Credit: Madeline Fox/WLRN)

The Life Changing Linguistics of Nigerian Scam Emails
(Credit: Getty)

The reason why Americans refer to autumn as fall
(Alex Ugalek/iStock via Getty Images)

In the poster for this year’s ITD (created by Graphic Designer Claudia Wolf) the “colourful branches represent the many indigenous languages, metaphorically growing on the big language tree”.

 

Further reading:

Around the web – July & August 2019

If you need to catch up with news about translation, interpreting, and language because you’ve been away over the holiday period, here’s a round-up of the most popular stories that you might have missed during July and August.

Parenting experiences of translators

Netlfix headquarters building in Silicon Valley

Try adding ‘only’ to various places in the line: “I found the eggs in the first shed”.

It’s a linguistic battlefield out there

 

On a sad note, in mid-August well-respected colleague Valerij Tomarenko died while hill-walking on the Scottish island of Arran. Heartfelt condolences to his family and friends.

Further reading:

Around the web – June 2019

I was delighted this month to finally be able to start working with a sit-stand desk. Do you have one? So here, sent while I’m standing at my desk, is your June round-up of the month’s most popular stories about translation, interpreting, and language.

  • In this video-gone-viral made for Wired, Professor Barry Olsen explains what it’s really like to be a professional interpreter. At the time of writing it’s had 1.8 million views!

screenshot from the video ‘Interpreter Breaks Down How Real-Time Translation Works’

Orwell and the English Language

Alan Wendt poses after a post-cabinet press conference at Parliament in Wellington, New Zealand. (Photograph: Hagen Hopkins)

Members of the Academie Francaise gather at the library before an induction ceremony at the Academie Francaise in Paris on December 15, 2016. (Photo by PATRICK KOVARIK / AFP)

On a personal note, as well as translating I also do some travel writing, and this month saw the publication of the new “Insight Guide to Mauritius, Reunion and Seychelles“. This is the 3rd edition, and the 2nd edition on which I’ve worked writing and updating the “Reunion” part.

Further reading:

Around the web – May 2019

This month I attended the ITI 2019 conference in Sheffield. Although not a member of the UK Institute of Translation and Interpreting, I was able to attend due to my membership of France’s sister organisation, SFT.  It was great to listen to some excellent, though-provoking presentations and meet colleagues old and new. I still kept abreast of social media while away from Reunion, so here is your monthly round-up of the most popular stories about translation and language for May 2019.

In Cutlers’ Hall, Day 2 of the ITI conference

Inside the library (photo courtesy Edmund de Waal)

Liam Cunningham, far right, who plays Davos Seaworth, in a scene from Game of Thrones.
(Photograph: HBO)

  • 8th May marked 74 years since the end of World War II. How much do you know about the Navajo Code Talkers who helped bring the Allied forces to victory?

Memorial to Navajo code talkers in Phoenix, Arizona (TED EYTAN, FLICKR // CC BY-SA 2.0)

On a final note I was very happy to participate in outreach this week, for the second year running, at the “Responsible Women” Forum held at a local secondary school to talk to 13-year old girls about careers, ambitions, and the responsibilities that go with them.

Further reading:

Around the web – April 2019

I was delighted this month to take part in a local TV programme that interviews entrepreneurs which you can see here. Anyway here is your monthly round-up of the most popular stories about translation and language for April 2019.

Children in Francophone Africa often learn to read, write and count in French – not their own language

Sorry, on ne comprend pas

Edge of the Knife: The film in a language only twenty people speak

The sign was supposed to guide shoppers to “alcohol-free beer” (Credit: Wales News Service)

Further reading:

Around the web – March 2019

On March 10th the world language community was saddened by the loss of three interpreters in the Ethiopian Airlines ET302 crash. Suzan Abul Farag, Esmat Orensa and Gachi de Luis were travelling to Kenya on a UN mission. Here’s your monthly round-up of the most popular stories about language and translation for March 2019.

Found in Translation 2017 graduate Vanessa Bui (second from right) interacted with a guest speaker during class. (Image courtesy of Feda Eid Photography.)

Latino outreach or Google Translate? 2020 Dems bungle Spanish websites

Chuddies … the Indian English term joins the OED. (Photograph: Todd Terje PR)

New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern announced a ban on all military-style semiautomatic weapons and assault rifles on March 21. (Reuters)

Further reading:

Around the web – February 2019

This month marked an important milestone for me, as a quarter of a century ago (!) on 25th February 1994 I created the company that would eventually become Smart Translate. On a more global scale, February 21st was annual International Mother Language Day. For more on the subject of language here’s a look at the most popular stories about translation and language for February 2019.

“There is nothing like a couple of sentences without verbs or articles to disorient viewers.”

Interpreters are called Tarjuman in Dari, the variety of Persian spoken in Afghanistan

What we talk about when we talk

Potavid

  • Humour: here are 6 hilarious video game voice-over fails.
  • Lastly, colleague Nikki Graham is currently running a survey on translation qualifications. You can participate here.

Further reading:

Around the web – December 2018 & January 2019

Here’s a look at the most popular stories about translation, interpreting, and language for December 2018 and January 2019*.

Karin Keller-Sutter is an alumni of The Institute of Translation and Interpreting at Zurich University of Applied Sciences.

“Toxic”, “single-use” and “misinformation” were amongst the words of the year for 2018.

Ducks gather on the bank of the Yauza river during snowfall in Moscow on December 19, 2018. (Photo by Kirill KUDRYAVTSEV / AFP)

“Insect Day” is more commonly known as “Inset Day”.

* I was away from late December until January (hence the round-up covering two months), and so I’ll leave you with a “translation” I saw on my travels …

close-up of the English

close-up of the French

Further reading: