Around the Web – April 2017

Easter fell during the month of April this year and I found out that the Hungarian word for the holiday is húsvét, which literally means ‘meat-taking’ (with reference to the end of Lent). Anyway here’s your April round-up of popular articles about language, interpreting, and translation.

Translation platforms cannot replace humans

Three little letters, 645 meanings.

The term double-headed has sometimes been part of the lexicon of duplicity, much like double-hearted.

  • There’s still a week before the second round of the French presidential election, which will be followed by the country’s legislative elections on June 11th and 18th. If you’re not fluent in French, here’s a handy guide to some terms used in the elections.

How do you say ‘fake news’ in French?

 

Further reading:

Around the web – March 2017

Did you know that the Finnish word for Marchmaaliskuu, is believed to come from the word maallinen in the sense of “earthly”, because snow begins to melt and first spots of bare earth can be seen? Anyway here’s your March round-up of popular articles about translation and language.

In 2006 Alitalia listed $39.00 for a business class fare from Toronto to Cyprus instead of the usual $3,900. Estimated cost to the carrier: $7.7m.

Now you can say ‘mansplaining’ in 35 languages

Does the available vocabulary for sex leave something to be desired?

Humour:

Would you use these solicitors?

Humour en français :

  • Quand quelqu’un ne connaît pas un métier cela donne lieu à des demandes totalement insolites (ici des demandes faites à des agences web).

Further reading:

Most popular tweets of 2016

Here, in ascending order, are the 10 most popular* tweets about translation and language that I shared during 2016 on my @Smart_Translate Twitter account:

Example of an unpronounceable word; 'unpronounceable' is the opposite of its meaning

Example of an unpronounceable word; ‘unpronounceable’ is the opposite of its meaning

Is 'languid' a word that describes itself? [Lady Lilith, by Dante Gabriel Rossetti]

Is ‘languid’ a word that describes itself? [Lady Lilith, by Dante Gabriel Rossetti]

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Some of the 250 translations into different language of "Le Petit Prince"

Some of the 250 translations into different language of “Le Petit Prince”

Do you have a favourite article published in 2016 you’d like to share? Don’t hesitate to leave it in the comments below.

* ‘most popular’ = most clicked on, according to Hootsuite.

Related articles:

Around the web – November 2016

November 2nd-5th saw ATA‘s 57th Annual Conference held in San Francisco, and colleagues Paula Arturo and Claire Cox have both blogged about it. The list of future ATA conference sites and dates is here. Anyway here’s your November round-up of popular articles about language and translation.

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Simon explains how to get clients to come to you

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“It looks, especially if you speak British English, as if Clinton was making a claim about the sanity level of Jeremy Corbyn”

The Norwegian Mr Bump.

The Norwegian Mr Bump.

  • Finally a quiz: Do you know these 25 Scottish words and phrases?

 

Further reading:

Around the web – October 2016

October 9th was world Hangeul Day. Do you know anything about Korea’s alphabet, which – because it was deliberately invented – is sometimes called the most scientific writing system in the world? Anyway, here’s your October round-up of popular articles about language and translation.

Donald Trump has been criticised for his lewd remarks about women

Donald Trump has been criticised for his lewd remarks about women

Der Oldtimer is a German word for a classic or vintage car (Credit: Alamy)

Der ‘Oldtimer’ is a German word for a classic or vintage car         (Credit: Alamy)

 Stradbroke Island in Queensland, Australia, faces a campaign to refer to it only by its Indigenous Australian name, Minjerribah. Photograph: naphakm/Getty Images

Stradbroke Island in Queensland, Australia, faces a campaign to refer to it only by its Indigenous Australian name, Minjerribah. Photograph: naphakm/Getty Images

Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious was made famous in the 1964 film Mary Poppins

Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious was made famous in the 1964 film Mary Poppins

  • Can you guess the language in this short quiz, using your knowledge of alphabets, language associations, and some educated guessing?

Further reading:

Around the web – September 2016

Here’s your round-up of popular articles about translation and language for the month of September.

Map of the EU - Overseas Countries and Territories and Outermost Regions. (source)

Map of the EU – Overseas Countries and Territories and Outermost Regions (source)

  • Errors can change a life when it comes to legal translation.
  • People have been told to use a new name for the country previously referred to as the Czech Republic: ‘Czechia’ in English, Tchequie in French and Tschechien in German. All are translations of Cesko in Czech.
Bridges span the River Vltava in Prague, the capital city of the Czech Republic (Sean Gallup/Getty Images)

Bridges span the River Vltava in Prague, the capital city of Czechia (Sean Gallup/Getty Images)

Being ill: office job vs freelancing

Being ill: office job vs freelancing

Fixed gear bikes are very popular with hipsters

Fixed gear bikes are very popular with hipsters

Poster for International Translation Day 2016

Poster for International Translation Day 2016

Further reading:

Around the web – July & August 2016

As many of us – myself included – have been taking some (well-earned) holiday at some point over the past two months, here’s your round-up of popular articles about language and translation during July AND August.

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Ever been ‘fired’ by an agency?

What do you call a dinosaur with an extensive vocabulary? A thesaurus!

What do you call a dinosaur with an extensive vocabulary? A thesaurus!

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Are any of your pet hates on this list?

  • If you’ve not been on holiday yet and are still looking for something to read, here’s a list of translated fiction. (One of my summer reads was The Vegetarian).
What were your holiday reads?

What were your holiday reads?

P.S. I also have a new podcast out – this time about how much of a walking cliché I am …

See also:

Around the web – June 2016

Unsurprisingly the run-up to and aftermath of the British referendum had a tendency to dominate news stories this month, including articles about translation and language.

  • Because this brings a smile let’s start with these possible names for EU exits for all members of the EU (my favourites are those for the Czech Republic and Hungary).
  • This article, written on May 9th, asks what Brexit could do to the UK’s translation industry.
  • Brexit also brought about linguistic queries from the USA concerning British use of the terms ‘surgery‘ and ‘hokey-cokey‘, as well as American attempts to try and use bollocks
When a US newspaper uses a front page full of Britishisms...

When a US newspaper uses a front page full of Britishisms…

'Time immemorial' is now used to mean “time beyond memory” or “time out of mind”, but it began life as a legal term in mediaeval England referring to anything that happened before the coronation of Richard I, on 6 July 1189.

‘Time immemorial’ is now used to mean “time beyond memory” or “time out of mind”, but it began life as a legal term in mediaeval England referring to anything that happened before the coronation of Richard I, on 6 July 1189.

Although I don’t teach English I recently recorded a short podcast for language learners, and chose as my subject what it’s like to be a translator in Reunion Island. You can listen to and/or watch the podcast (and 101 others!) for free at Anglais.re’s website.

My podcast is titled 'The Invisible Woman'.

My podcast about translation is entitled ‘The Invisible Woman’.

Related articles:

Around the web – May 2016

I had the pleasure this month of receiving a copy of a photography book that I’d translated – it’s always a pleasure to see one’s name in print, isn’t it? Anyway, here’s a round-up of the most popular articles about language and translation that appeared online in May.

  • Alina Cincan of Inbox Translation undertook a mammoth task this month when she compiled a blog post with the favourite tools of 72 professional translators, including yours truly. CAT tools were excluded, and everything listed is either free or very affordable.
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I love this photo mosaic!

  • How do you deal with translating references to songs? Should they remain the same in your translation?
  • Could understanding other cultures’ concepts of joy and well-being help us reshape our own?
The Positive Lexicography Project aims to catalogue foreign terms for happiness that have no direct English translation. ILLUSTRATION BY JULIANNA BRION

The Positive Lexicography Project aims to catalogue foreign terms for happiness that have no direct English translation. (Illustration by Julianna Brion)

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He, she, they: it’s as easy as one, two three (Credit: Alamy)

I’ll leave you with this quote that I came across recently.

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Related articles:

Around the web – April 2016

I spent a day this month participating in a training course for sworn translators. Have you done any CPD recently? Anyway, here’s your monthly round-up of the most popular articles about translation and language that appeared online in April.

The French greeting: Should it be 'tu' or 'vous'? (PHOTO: ISTOCK)

The French greeting: Should it be ‘tu’ or ‘vous’? (PHOTO: ISTOCK)

Map of the word 'tea' in European languages (source)

Map of the word ‘tea’ in European languages (source)

 

Related articles: