Around the web – February 2018

This month I had the pleasure – and honour – of spending a morning at the Careers Fair of a local high school talking to final year pupils about my profession. Whether or not you’re also a professional translator I hope you’ll find something of interest in February’s round-up of popular stories about language and translation.

  • With February commonly being associated with love, not surprisingly the most popular article I shared listed a dozen pet names in other languages that don’t work quite so well when translated into English.

Sparrows, elephants, microbes, and potatoes … some pet names don’t work quite so well in English

  • February 21st was International Mother Language Day, and UNESCO reiterated its commitment to linguistic diversity as a reminder that linguistic diversity and multilingualism are essential for sustainable development.
  • This Economist article looked at the the painful origins of many creole languages, which have often – but not always – evolved from slavery.

“Those unfamiliar with creoles, thinking them mere patois, argot or vernacular, are missing a glorious display of the ingenuity of those speakers who turned old languages into something brilliantly new”

Elle France asked if “souping” was a new trend, but critics disagreed, and others queried the use of “ing” on French words

L’académicien Pierre Nora et la secrétaire perpétuelle de l’Académie française Hélène Carrère d’Encausse, en janvier 2016. © Jacques Demarthon / AFP

 

Further reading:

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3 responses

  1. Pingback: Translation favorites (Mar 2-15)

  2. Pingback: Around the web – March 2018 | A Smart Translator's Reunion

  3. Pingback: Around the web – April 2018 | A Smart Translator's Reunion

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