Around the web – January 2016

Has 2016 got off to a good start for you? I was pleased to see the publication this month of one of my side projects: the Insight Guide to Mauritius, Reunion & Seychelles, for which I revised and updated the Reunion section. Anyway here’s a round-up of the most popular language and translation-related articles that have appeared online this past month.

The realities of speech are much more complicated than the words used to describe it. (David Gray / Reuters)

The realities of speech are much more complicated than the words used to describe it. (David Gray / Reuters)

  • Aside from the obvious spelling differences between theatre (UK) and theater (US), did you know there are also differences in meaning? Lynne Murphy tells all in her Separated by a Common Language blog.
  • Colleague Simon Berrill blogged about the trustworthiness (or not) of his personal accounting system. How many clients have you failed to invoice?
  • If you’re a French to English, German, Spanish, Italian or Portuguese translator you’ll find this list of France’s official Ministry & Minister title translations handy.
  • English to Italian translator Valentina Ambrogio blogged about her experience with translation scammers.
  • As a freelancer, where do you find is the most product place to work? Coffee shop? Co-working space? Home?
  • Ever get fed up with the question “so how many languages do you speak?” when you meet someone for the first time? Well here’s a way to strike back.
 A handy guide to atmospheric elevation of spoken communication

The linguists strike back…

  • Do you use ‘air punctuation’? Or get annoyed by people who do? Take a look at this tongue-in-cheek guide.
A handy guide to atmospheric elevation of spoken communication

(Part of) A handy guide to atmospheric elevation of spoken communication

In French: Il me court sur le haricot. What it means: He’s annoying me. (James Chapman / BuzzFeed)

In French: Il me court sur le haricot.
What it means: He’s annoying me.
(James Chapman / BuzzFeed)

  • Finally, if you don’t know Alexandra Hispafra’s blog, do take a look (in French). Amongst other posts she regularly interviews linguists, and I was delighted to be January’s guest translator.

 

Related articles:

6 responses

  1. Pingback: Around the web – February 2016 | A Smart Translator's Reunion

  2. Pingback: Around the web – March 2016 | A Smart Translator's Reunion

  3. Pingback: Around the web – April 2016 | A Smart Translator's Reunion

  4. Pingback: Weekly translation favorites (Feb 5-11)

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